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Who is Wilfrid Jury? (Part 5)

Wilfrid Jury’s Legacy

Wilfrid Jury was an important archaeologist in Ontario who helped us define and understand archaeological settlements across Ontario. The Museum of Ontario Archaeology is one of many legacies Wilfrid Jury leaves behind. His excavations and collections provide a fundamental understanding of aboriginal and pioneer culture. The Museum of Ontario Archaeology’s collection holds Jury’s original scholarly articles, site reports, short stories, and photos chronicling his life as well as the large ethnographic and archaeological collection he accumulated over his lifetime. His goal was to preserve objects of past generations for future generations to come. The Museum of Ontario Archaeology continues his legacy by advancing the understanding of Ontario’s archaeological heritage through stewardship, research, and education.

summerschool

As well as curating the Museum of Indian Archaeology and Pioneer Life (now MOA) on Western’s campus (in June 1934), Wilf introduced Archaeology as a practice to Western. He taught an archaeology class and established field schools to give students hands on opportunities of learning at a number of sites he excavated through the years, a practice that continues to this day. Site reports, photos, and artifacts from these excavations are held in the Museum of Ontario Archaeology collections and are often referenced in current research.

Unveiling of Jury Drive
Unveiling of Jury Drive

Meanwhile, the City of London gave him the honor of having a public school named after him, Wilfrid Jury Public School (on Lawson Road in London) and he also was present at the unveiling of a street named after him, Jury Drive (Bayfield Ontario).

 Wilfrid Jury’s legacy continues to bring knowledge and understanding that stems from his own passion to “teach and disseminate a knowledge of earlier people to the public and especially young people” – Elsie’s Summary of Wilf’s Life.  He set the standard in Ontario Archaeology and changed archaeological perspectives which continually shape our understanding of past civilizations today.

Learn more about Wilfrid Jury:

Comments

Scarlett Janusas
Reply

HI – I’m writing a book on the Women of Ontario Archaeology and plan to include Elsie Jury in the book. I was lucky enough to have know Elsie when I first started out in archaeology at Western, so doing research on Elsie has special meaning for me. I understand you hold Elsie’s memoirs – and I was hoping to access them. Could you please let me know if this is possible?

Regards
Scarlett Janusas

Neil Paradis
Reply

Hi Madison,
My grandfather (Frank Coombs ) worked on the archieology sites at Saint Marie Among the Hurons and at the Penetanguishene Military Settlement. My mother ( Rose Coombs maiden name). Has a picture with Dr. Jury with Frank Coombs at the Penetanguishene Settlement dated 1967. My Grandfather is cleaning off a brick from a chimney of one of the buildings. Approx.20 Years ago we saw our grandfather on a large mural at Saint Marie in their main lobby. At some point it was taken down, we inquired but they didnt know where the mural was. I’m wondering if MOA may have pictures of my Grandfather with or without Dr. Jury ?
Best Regards
Neil Paradis
Barrie Ontario

Heather Hatch
Reply

Hello Neil – please check your email for a response.
Thank you,
Heather Hatch
Collections Manager

Willem(Bill) Bruinink
Reply

I went to Summer School of Indian Archaeology put on by Western. I went for summers starting 1960. Is there anything in the Jury archives on this? Looking for pictures. I did get a copy of the written report of the Forget site from you. It was not written by Jury.

Heather Hatch
Reply

Hello Bill – I have send you an email.

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