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Virtual Reality

Experience archaeology like never before using the HTC Vive in the MOA VRchaeology room.

What’s On

VR Iroquoian Longhouse

Experience blazing fires, sleeping bunks strewn with furs, and stored food as you wander through a 16th century longhouse. Try the virtual archery range or handle objects and learn about archaeological artifacts from the Lawson Site.

Developed by Western University PhD candidate Michael Carter, this exhibit combines the interpretation of archaeological evidence and ethno-historic records with CGI and VR production. This is the first Virtual Reality exhibit in London and one of only a few in Canada where archaeological finds are transformed into such an immersive experience.

 

Medieval Boxwood Prayer Bead

Boxwood Prayer Beads have ignited wonder and curiosity since their creation in the Netherlands in the 16th century. The beads feature intricate carvings in a miniature scale to create a personal  link between the viewer and their faith. The beads were used in prayer and meditation, with each layer within the bead sharing the complex stories of The Bible.

Once scanned, I was able to “deconstruct” the beads in the computer, demonstrating that they were composed of a complex series of elements, which were then assembled such that it was impossible to see seams from the front.  In this case, the bead was all made from the same material (box wood), but the three dimensionality and the ability to manipulate the data virtually were the keys to understanding the bead’s construction.

                        -Dr. Andrew Nelson, Western University-

The result of this project? A greater appreciation for the sophistication and craftsmanship of these medieval artisans.