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Photographing Artifacts: FSC project

Photographing Fugitive Slave Chapel Artifacts 

Larry has volunteered to take photograph some of the important artifacts from the Fugitive Slave Chapel site. In the early afternoon, he was taking pictures of important bottles for future research.  We caught him photographing a medicine bottle with the words “pain killer” and “vegetable”. Researchers will find a date and more details about the product.

You can do a quick search for “pain killer vegetable bottle” on Google and see what you find! Who knows, the artifact featured in this video could be Perry Davis’ vegetable pain killer…

Photography and archaeology:

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Cataloguing Artifacts

The attached videos feature Rebecca who is working on the “in between” step to help the cataloguer.  She is using an Excel spreadsheet to keep track of the items found in the field bags. If any interesting items are found or notes need to be made associated with the unit items being cleaned, they are documented. This will help the cataloguer and make it easy to access certain artifacts when all items are put into storage.

Artifacts are also sorted into smaller bags within the larger field bag. For example, ceramic patterns are sorted and matched if possible and bones might be put together.

Some of the coolest things that have been found are bottles with embossed writing. A lot of information can be gained from these bottles. One item was found to be from a quack doctor’s “miracle medicine” concoction. Read more

Artifact Washing: FSC Site

Artifact Washing Process:

Small groups of 6-8 people work to help wash artifacts from the Fugitive Slave Chapel site. In the summer, 1 meter square units were excavated on the site and any materials found in that space were documented and kept together in “field bags” with attached provenience information: site number, unit coordinates, level, date, and excavator’s initials. Each bag is given a separate number for the site. Artifacts from the completed units are taken to a lab for processing.

At the Museum of Ontario Archaeology, volunteers are taking items out of the field bags to wash. Read more

Meet Laura: MOA’s Education Assistant

Meet Laura Walter, Education Assistant

Laura

I am in the Public History MA program, at Western University, and I am currently carrying out my research assistantship at the museum. I started last September, and was thrown into a very busy fall, with a different school group visiting, roughly every Monday and Wednesday that I was at the museum. I help with providing tours, conducting First Nations craft sessions, preparing curriculum based programming, and outreach programming. My favourite part of the position is getting to interact with the children, seeing their faces light up as they step back in time and learn about the First Nations people in Southern Ontario. Particularly with Museum School, which is an excellent program, as it allows for me and the others working in education to get to know the children, and see their knowledge of First Nations history and culture develop, as they spend their week at the museum.

Coming from Penetanguishene, and having previous experience at Huronia Museum, in Midland, I was expecting the museum to have the typical archaeological artifacts in rows of glass cases, but the gallery space is visually pleasing; with historical wall paintings, a hanging canoe, and longhouse, along with being interactive; as one can step into Wilfred Jury’s office or dig in an archaeological site. One of the great aspects of the school tours, is that children can physically handle artifacts, while learn about their purpose, to gain an overall idea of how these early people lived.

To those who are interested in volunteering at the museum in education, if you enjoy learning and sharing history and like a busy energetic environment, the education department can always use the extra hand, as the visiting group size increase all the time. Although, it is a lot of information at first, with time and practice, you will be able to increase your First Nations knowledge, communication skills, and time management ability, while having fun.

To follow my journey through the Public History program at Western University, check out my blog lwalter23.wordpress.com

Dakota’s blog “I found my Way”

Dakota

I Found My Way…

Sheko:li, my name is Dakota Ireland. My spirit name means She Gathers; I come from the Bear Clan within the Oneida Nation of the Thames. I have recently joined the staff here at the Museum of Ontario Archaeology. I am an Education Assistant Intern, so I help out with tours, workshops, activities, crafts, and other various areas of the museum, if needed. Before I got this job, my main background was in customer service and retail.

I wanted a change from my usual jobs, and I got started with Southwest Regional Healing Lodge, located in Muncey, as a Childcare Worker. I really enjoy working with children, so it was a step in the right direction. The job was not reliable though, so I continued searching. I wanted to work in a women’s shelter, but there were not any openings. Read more

January Palisade Newsletter

January 2014 Palisade e-Post Newsletter

Welcome to 2014! In this months’ newsletter:

  • Save the date for Winter Village Family Fun Day: Monday, February 17th
  • MOA gets a new logo
  • January 19th Moccasin Making Workshop
  • London Chapter OAS meeting January 9th
  • Flotation project at MOA (and upcoming exhibit)
  • Job Shadow student describes her experience at MOA this past December
  • Help a Child come to Camp

Click here to view the PDF: January Newsletter.
Send us your email to sign up for monthly newsletters.

MOA’s new logo

MOA_Logo

The Museum of Ontario Archaeology’s logo reflects our belief that archaeology is (first and foremost) about people.

The hand print represents the people whose stories are being brought to life through archaeological research as well as everyone involved in archaeological activities.  The stylized palisade represents our connection to the Lawson Village, a 16th century Neutral Iroquoian village located beside the museum.  Together the palisade and the hand print represent the people who lived in this place, MOA’s responsibility to steward and protect the site, and the people who continue to draw meaning and value from their ongoing connection to the history of this place.

As one respondent in a recent survey noted, “Images of pith helmets, fedoras and bones are iconic, but not really representative, and images of particular cultures or specific tools are too narrow to encompass all that archaeology represents.”  We have deliberately chosen a design that tries to encompass everything archaeology is about while recognizing the museum’s unique relationship with the Lawson Village site.

The logo is designed to work effectively in both colour and in black & white.  The colours represent energy, excitement, and adventure.

MOA_Logo2

Job Shadowing at MOA

The week of December 2nd, MOA welcomed Lindsay, a high school student from Alymer who spent a week taking part in a job shadowing experience.

Lindsay enjoyed her time at MOA where she worked with our collections and helped with educational programming.
Lindsay learned how to use PastPerfect software which is used to catalogue the collection. She handled artifacts and learned how they were stored for archival purposes. She even had a unique chance to tour Sustainable Archaeology. At the end of the week, she was more involved with educational programming, helping with pottery and soapstone pendant workshops and even sat in on some tours.

Have a listen to an interview between Jennifer (MOA’s Public Relation officer) and Lindsay about her time at MOA.