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Volunteer Profile: Mark Wilcox

Hello, I’m Mark Wilcox, volunteering here at MOA from ATN Access. I’m here to help in the gift shop for a 10 week placement. Many of the things I do at ATN is research for local jobs, write resumes, and fill out job applications.

I’m also known as the “Ribbonator” because I’ve acquired professional ribbon curling status! I’ve been helping Jennifer in the gift shop doing various skill building tasks that I can transfer into a full time job. Since there are many birthday parties, I’ve been learning how to curl ribbon (many guys can’t say they have this talent). I’ve gotten so good that I could be Spiderman’s sidekick, spraying curled ribbon from my wrist.

'Me' as the Ribbonator
‘Me’ as the Ribbonator
Medicine Wheel Smudge Kit
Medicine Wheel Smudge Kit
Improving the Gardens
Working in the Gardens
A professional 'selfie' :)
A professional ‘selfie’ 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other things I’ve learned have been receiving orders and maintaining inventory, creating museum-made items, greeting visitors, using the cash register, gallery maintenance, photographing, gardening, and much much more!

Before coming to MOA, I had graduated from high school and was looking for work. I was happy to hear that I’d be working in a gift shop because I have a lot of retail experience, there’s a lot to keep me busy here at the Museum, and I have an interest in history. When I’m not at work, I enjoy playing soccer, reading, hanging out with friends, going to the movie theatre, and looking for a fun job.

My favourite part of my job is working with customers, showing them around the museum, and working at the cash register when I’m needed. If there’s one thing to tell the world about MOA it’s that it’s an interesting place to bring your kids because it tells you about Ontario’s First Nation people’s history.

June Palisade Newsletter

Featured in this month’s Palisade e-Post:

– New exhibit now open: Story of Our Grandfathers: Our Original Stories
– New membership program has launched at MOA
– We’re open daily this summer. Interpreters will be on site from July to August.
– Celebrate Solidarity day June 21st
– Mark you calendars for Wilfrid Jury Archaeology Day July 26th
– Register now for Summer Camp
– June 8 moccasin workshop is full but you can leave us your name

Click here to view the June Newsletter

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Museum Memory

Today is Museum Memories Day and I’d love to share with you my recent discovery.

A couple weeks ago, I was going through my family photos  which my dad digitally archived over the course of a few winters. I was shocked and excited to come across this photo of myself at the Museum of Ontario Archaeology at the age of six. I had never seen this image before and couldn’t wait to share it with my co-workers and MOA friends. I’ve been told that this is the second version of a longhouse that was built on this site. The palisade poles and longhouse are quite different today. Read more

TMHC War of 1812 Artifacts

War of 1812 Artifacts Archaeological excavations conducted by Timmins Martelle Heritage Consultants Inc. (TMHC) uncovered a small number of artifacts from the War of 1812. These included a musket ball, two buck shot and a caltrop. Click here to see image examples.  The musket ball measured between 16.5 mm (0.65 inch) and 17.0 mm (0.67 inch) in diameter, and both buck shot measured in the double naught size range, that is, between 8.4 mm (0.33 inch) and 8.9 mm (0.35 inch) in diameter. These sizes were consistent with the buck and ball load American troops employed during the War of 1812. Buck and ball was a paper cartridge containing one musket ball and two or three buck shot. The purpose was to increase the chance of hitting a target with the bonus possibility of hitting multiple targets with one shot. The smaller buck shot might not kill a target but could cause enough injury to remove a soldier from battle.

buck and ball
Buck and Ball found during excavations by TMHC

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Work Study Profile: Marta

Marta

My name is Marta and I’m an education assistant at the museum. I’ve only worked here for a few months but it feels much, much longer. As an education assistant I do a lot of really cool things. How many other people can say they made soup over a camp fire at work? But my main job is educational tours, mostly with school groups. I love working with kids – they provide unique new insights into the most mundane things and I always get a fresh perspective on something I have done countless of times. Their questions usually make me question things I’ve never thought about before, which in turn leads me to expanding my own knowledge. This is what makes each tour unique, even though, technically, I repeat the same information every time. Read more

April Palisade Newsletter

Featured in this month’s Palisade e-Post:

April Newsletter

– April 2nd: Before Ontario Thought Exchange at Toronto Public Library
– April 6th Moccasin Making Workshop * Cancelled as of April 2nd.
– London Chapter OAS meeting April 10th: research from Cedar Creek
Earthworks
– Featured Artifact from Fugitive Slave Chapel
– Supplies needed for Educational Programming
– Sweat Ceremony April 15th
– Upcoming Canadian Archaeological Association conference in London

Provide us with your email to receive our monthly newsletter: Jennifer@archaeologymuseum.ca

Simcoe’s Boat found in Thames

For Immediate Release                                                                                                                                                 April 1, 2014

Simcoe’s Boat Found  in Thames River

Local archaeologists have discovered a remnant of an ancient boat found in the Thames River. It is believed to have belonged to Simcoe on his voyage here in the late 1700s. Last summer’s low river levels presented archaeologists with an opportunity to investigate the soil beneath the bed of the Thames River, revealing a historically significant piece of wood.  Professor Anaidni Senoj was leading his team’s excavation and recounts his discovery:  “When I came across the piece of wood, I knew immediately that I’d hit historical gold. I chuckled to myself, tipped my fedora, and said my favourite Indiana Jones quote from The Last Crusade: ‘This should be in a Museum!'” Read more

Work Study Profile: Jillian

Jillian Baker showing her purple pride for Western University
Jillian Baker showing her purple pride for Western University

Hello! My name is Jillian Baker, and I am a third year student at Western University, double majoring in First Nations Studies and English literature.  I have spent three terms with the museum now, working as both an Education Assistant during the year, and the Head Camp Counsellor over the summer. My job ranges across a variety of disciplines,  allowing me to both hone my own teaching skills with regards to cultural studies, while also gathering a thorough grounding in the ins and outs of archaeology. When I am not at the museum, I can be found reading a book, or –more likely– eating. I enjoy good quality cheeses and home baked treats.

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