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Museum Memory

Today is Museum Memories Day and I’d love to share with you my recent discovery.

A couple weeks ago, I was going through my family photos  which my dad digitally archived over the course of a few winters. I was shocked and excited to come across this photo of myself at the Museum of Ontario Archaeology at the age of six. I had never seen this image before and couldn’t wait to share it with my co-workers and MOA friends. I’ve been told that this is the second version of a longhouse that was built on this site. The palisade poles and longhouse are quite different today. Read more

TMHC War of 1812 Artifacts

War of 1812 Artifacts Archaeological excavations conducted by Timmins Martelle Heritage Consultants Inc. (TMHC) uncovered a small number of artifacts from the War of 1812. These included a musket ball, two buck shot and a caltrop. Click here to see image examples.  The musket ball measured between 16.5 mm (0.65 inch) and 17.0 mm (0.67 inch) in diameter, and both buck shot measured in the double naught size range, that is, between 8.4 mm (0.33 inch) and 8.9 mm (0.35 inch) in diameter. These sizes were consistent with the buck and ball load American troops employed during the War of 1812. Buck and ball was a paper cartridge containing one musket ball and two or three buck shot. The purpose was to increase the chance of hitting a target with the bonus possibility of hitting multiple targets with one shot. The smaller buck shot might not kill a target but could cause enough injury to remove a soldier from battle.

buck and ball
Buck and Ball found during excavations by TMHC

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Work Study Profile: Marta

Marta

My name is Marta and I’m an education assistant at the museum. I’ve only worked here for a few months but it feels much, much longer. As an education assistant I do a lot of really cool things. How many other people can say they made soup over a camp fire at work? But my main job is educational tours, mostly with school groups. I love working with kids – they provide unique new insights into the most mundane things and I always get a fresh perspective on something I have done countless of times. Their questions usually make me question things I’ve never thought about before, which in turn leads me to expanding my own knowledge. This is what makes each tour unique, even though, technically, I repeat the same information every time. Read more

April Palisade Newsletter

Featured in this month’s Palisade e-Post:

April Newsletter

– April 2nd: Before Ontario Thought Exchange at Toronto Public Library
– April 6th Moccasin Making Workshop * Cancelled as of April 2nd.
– London Chapter OAS meeting April 10th: research from Cedar Creek
Earthworks
– Featured Artifact from Fugitive Slave Chapel
– Supplies needed for Educational Programming
– Sweat Ceremony April 15th
– Upcoming Canadian Archaeological Association conference in London

Provide us with your email to receive our monthly newsletter: Jennifer@archaeologymuseum.ca

Simcoe’s Boat found in Thames

For Immediate Release                                                                                                                                                 April 1, 2014

Simcoe’s Boat Found  in Thames River

Local archaeologists have discovered a remnant of an ancient boat found in the Thames River. It is believed to have belonged to Simcoe on his voyage here in the late 1700s. Last summer’s low river levels presented archaeologists with an opportunity to investigate the soil beneath the bed of the Thames River, revealing a historically significant piece of wood.  Professor Anaidni Senoj was leading his team’s excavation and recounts his discovery:  “When I came across the piece of wood, I knew immediately that I’d hit historical gold. I chuckled to myself, tipped my fedora, and said my favourite Indiana Jones quote from The Last Crusade: ‘This should be in a Museum!'” Read more

Work Study Profile: Jillian

Jillian Baker showing her purple pride for Western University
Jillian Baker showing her purple pride for Western University

Hello! My name is Jillian Baker, and I am a third year student at Western University, double majoring in First Nations Studies and English literature.  I have spent three terms with the museum now, working as both an Education Assistant during the year, and the Head Camp Counsellor over the summer. My job ranges across a variety of disciplines,  allowing me to both hone my own teaching skills with regards to cultural studies, while also gathering a thorough grounding in the ins and outs of archaeology. When I am not at the museum, I can be found reading a book, or –more likely– eating. I enjoy good quality cheeses and home baked treats.

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Selected Artifacts from the Fugitive Slave Chapel Site

Fugitive Slave Chapel Artifacts

Objects found at an archaeological site tell us a lot about the people who lived there. After all, archaeology is the study of material evidence left behind by humans in order to understand their behaviour.

We cannot yet tell you a lot about life at the Fugitive Slave Chapel because analysis of the artifacts has only just begun. The artifacts were excavated in May to July 2013 and were washed and processed in January 2014. The research that has been found was collected thanks to volunteer efforts. The Museum of Ontario Archaeology is lucky to have the chance to display these artifacts to the public before they are analysed and researched by the archaeological team, Timmins Martelle Heritage Consultants.

Out of 41 excavated units, a total of 8 potential cultural features were identified on the site. One may have been a grey water pit and others were likely small refuse pits which explains the wide assortment of ceramics, glassware, and buttons.

 Selected artifacts from the Fugitive Slave Chapel Site

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Work Study Profile: Lor

Lor at our Annual Pow Wow September 2013.
Lor (Left) and a volunteer at our Annual Pow Wow September 2013.

Hello, my name is Lor Garry and I’m an Education Assistant at the Museum of Ontario Archaeology. I have been working at the Museum since September 2013 as part of the Work Study program through Western University.Previously, I have had other teaching-related positions, such as at the Children’s Museum as a Day Camp Counselor and other tutoring and mentoring programs, but I wanted to branch out and get involved with an organization with a more specific focus. I have always been really interested in history, so I thought that getting involved with educational programming at the Museum would build upon my previous skills and take me in a new direction. Read more

Work Study Profile: Rory

Rory

Hello, my name is Rory Hibbs. I began working for the museum this past September as a Camp Activity Designer. I have bachelor’s degree in history from Wilfrid Laurier University in Waterloo, Ontario.  I have had an interest in history for as long as I can remember. My first major assignment was a diorama on the Titanic in the 1st grade and I’ve been hooked ever since.  Learning about our past in whatever form is always interesting.

What inspired you to work at MOA?
I came to the museum through a work-study program through Western University.  What drew me to the position was the possibility of working around history and engaging with artifacts, which are our direct link to the past.  I think it is a great thing to introduce young children to cultural artifacts.  It is the best way to inspire children to get involved with their past. Read more