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Underwater Archaeology

Underwater Archaeology is one of the many hands-on workshops offered at Museum of Ontario Archaeology. This program explains how archaeologists use context and critical thinking while excavating in order to understand the site and to put together stories that artifacts may reveal about the culture of the site.

Underwater archaeology is more difficult than archaeology on land as you have to know how to dive, breathe under water, maneuver through dark or muddy waters, communicate to your team, avoid sharks (this is very important!), and write and record your findings while under water. You air tanks even limit the time you can spend excavating.

Instructions: Read more

Archaeology Around the World Camp

Archaeology Around the World camp – July 21st to July 25th (and August 25 to 29th) 2014.

Quill Writing

Archaeology around the world is a theme that’s all about encouraging a sense of adventure and exploration! Learn about unique archaeological sites around the world.

This week starts off with the ancient Romans and Greeks, when you’ll get to learn about the mythology and culture that became the basis of modern Western civilization. We’ll test your knowledge with trivia and make wonderful Gods/Goddesses themed crafts. We make olive wreaths and use sheets and blankets to throw a toga fashion show!

On Tuesday we explore China, the country with one of the oldest continuous civilizations in the world! You’ll get to learn about Chinese art, culture and symbolism and use that knowledge to make your own clay terra cotta warriors, paper lanterns and fly handmade kites in the park. Tuesday is also water day so we get to do a water balloon toss, play ‘drip drip drop’ and have a wild time in the sun splashing around! Read more

Work Study Profile: Marta

Marta

My name is Marta and I’m an education assistant at the museum. I’ve only worked here for a few months but it feels much, much longer. As an education assistant I do a lot of really cool things. How many other people can say they made soup over a camp fire at work? But my main job is educational tours, mostly with school groups. I love working with kids – they provide unique new insights into the most mundane things and I always get a fresh perspective on something I have done countless of times. Their questions usually make me question things I’ve never thought about before, which in turn leads me to expanding my own knowledge. This is what makes each tour unique, even though, technically, I repeat the same information every time. Read more

Work Study Profile: Jillian

Jillian Baker showing her purple pride for Western University
Jillian Baker showing her purple pride for Western University

Hello! My name is Jillian Baker, and I am a third year student at Western University, double majoring in First Nations Studies and English literature.  I have spent three terms with the museum now, working as both an Education Assistant during the year, and the Head Camp Counsellor over the summer. My job ranges across a variety of disciplines,  allowing me to both hone my own teaching skills with regards to cultural studies, while also gathering a thorough grounding in the ins and outs of archaeology. When I am not at the museum, I can be found reading a book, or –more likely– eating. I enjoy good quality cheeses and home baked treats.

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Work Study Profile: Lor

Lor at our Annual Pow Wow September 2013.
Lor (Left) and a volunteer at our Annual Pow Wow September 2013.

Hello, my name is Lor Garry and I’m an Education Assistant at the Museum of Ontario Archaeology. I have been working at the Museum since September 2013 as part of the Work Study program through Western University.Previously, I have had other teaching-related positions, such as at the Children’s Museum as a Day Camp Counselor and other tutoring and mentoring programs, but I wanted to branch out and get involved with an organization with a more specific focus. I have always been really interested in history, so I thought that getting involved with educational programming at the Museum would build upon my previous skills and take me in a new direction. Read more

Work Study Profile: Rory

Rory

Hello, my name is Rory Hibbs. I began working for the museum this past September as a Camp Activity Designer. I have bachelor’s degree in history from Wilfrid Laurier University in Waterloo, Ontario.  I have had an interest in history for as long as I can remember. My first major assignment was a diorama on the Titanic in the 1st grade and I’ve been hooked ever since.  Learning about our past in whatever form is always interesting.

What inspired you to work at MOA?
I came to the museum through a work-study program through Western University.  What drew me to the position was the possibility of working around history and engaging with artifacts, which are our direct link to the past.  I think it is a great thing to introduce young children to cultural artifacts.  It is the best way to inspire children to get involved with their past. Read more

March Break at MOA

Pop-Up Museum Activities throughout March Break

If you’re spending March break with your kids (or grandkids) you can bring them by the museum for a visit. We are open Monday to Friday from 10 am – 4:30 pm and will be featuring different ‘pop-up’ museum activities throughout the week. These will include crafts, games, and interactive exhibit additions. To find out what we are doing and at what time, pay close attention to our Facebook page where the day’s activities will be revealed each morning.  Pop-up activities will include snowsnake throwing, pottery reconstruction, cookie excavations, snow painting, storytelling, and more! Regular admission rates apply.

Snowsnake, a favorite March Break Activity
March Break Activity: Pottery Reconstruction
Cookie Excavation during March Break

 

 

 

 

 

March Break – MOA Olympics!

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MOA and the Ontario Curriculum

MOA Education Programming 

There are many considerations to keep in mind when developing education school programs: suitability to age groups, time needed, relevance to the museum content, but the most important is compatibility with the official curriculum, which can be found here . Teachers must prove their field trips are in line with the curriculum; so, we make it easy for them.

All the Museum of Ontario Archaeology school programming is designed to compliment the Ontario Curriculum, primarily Social Studies, as that is the most fitting compliment to archaeology and First Nations history and culture. However, we also compliment the Arts, Science and Technology and Mathematics when applicable. Read more

Meet Laura: MOA’s Education Assistant

Meet Laura Walter, Education Assistant

Laura

I am in the Public History MA program, at Western University, and I am currently carrying out my research assistantship at the museum. I started last September, and was thrown into a very busy fall, with a different school group visiting, roughly every Monday and Wednesday that I was at the museum. I help with providing tours, conducting First Nations craft sessions, preparing curriculum based programming, and outreach programming. My favourite part of the position is getting to interact with the children, seeing their faces light up as they step back in time and learn about the First Nations people in Southern Ontario. Particularly with Museum School, which is an excellent program, as it allows for me and the others working in education to get to know the children, and see their knowledge of First Nations history and culture develop, as they spend their week at the museum.

Coming from Penetanguishene, and having previous experience at Huronia Museum, in Midland, I was expecting the museum to have the typical archaeological artifacts in rows of glass cases, but the gallery space is visually pleasing; with historical wall paintings, a hanging canoe, and longhouse, along with being interactive; as one can step into Wilfred Jury’s office or dig in an archaeological site. One of the great aspects of the school tours, is that children can physically handle artifacts, while learn about their purpose, to gain an overall idea of how these early people lived.

To those who are interested in volunteering at the museum in education, if you enjoy learning and sharing history and like a busy energetic environment, the education department can always use the extra hand, as the visiting group size increase all the time. Although, it is a lot of information at first, with time and practice, you will be able to increase your First Nations knowledge, communication skills, and time management ability, while having fun.

To follow my journey through the Public History program at Western University, check out my blog lwalter23.wordpress.com

January 2014 Moccasin Making Workshop

Back by popular demand, the Museum of Ontario Archaeology is hosting another Moccasin Making Workshop. Register now for this unique opportunity to make your own pair of moccasins!

Sunday, January 19th 2014 from 9 am – 4:30 pm

Six Nations artist Marjorie Henhawk will be teaching you how to make your own pair from genuine hide and cozy felt. Create a pair to fit your own feet or as a gift for family/friends.

January moccasin workshop

Cost: $70 for womens size 9 and under; $75 for womens/mens size 10+
A $15 non-refundable deposit is required to secure your spot

Age: Workshop is for ages 14+

Location: The workshop will be held in the classroom at the Museum of Ontario Archaeology.

What to bring: Please bring your own bagged lunch and morning coffee (if required), an outline of each foot, and a sharp pair of scissors. Update: Please also bring a fleece lining if possible but not a very thick (you’ll have to sew through leather and the fleece!

Advanced registration is required – space is limited to 10 registrants. Register by phoning the Museum at 519-473-1360. Please note: Registration is now full for this workshop but please contact the museum to be placed on a contact list for future workshops.