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A Look Back: An Unusual Holcombe Point in the Vogt Collection

Originally from the Palisade Post, 1987 Vol 9 no.1

The museum received a donation of artifacts from the Vogt family, obtained from Lambton County. One of the artifacts in this collection is an unusual “Holcombe” point.

Drawing made for the museum by artist Catherine Comrie.

The Holcombe point type was first defined on the basis of specimens recovered on Holcombe Beach in Macomb County Michigan. Often made from Onondaga or Bayport Chert, this lanceolate point with a concave base and fine parallel flaking is confined to the later part of the Paleo Period ca.8000 BCE.

Holcombe points are always quite thin, have lateral edge grinding, and are rarely fluted. Although rare in Southern Ontario, at least one site with predominantly Holcombe points has been documented in the area.

This point classified as Holcombe is made from Flint Ridge Chert, which outcrops in Ohio. According to knowledgeable researchers, very few Holcombe points are made of this material.

At first glance, this point appears to be uni-facially fluted (ie. similar to fluted points). Close examination reveals that a large flake was removed during the preform stage, and that it is not a flute but rather a scar from a large flake removed from the tip. The concave base has been heavily retouched but is not ground.

Based on size alone, this point is much larger than typical Holcombe points measuring at 5.7cm in length. As with the specimens found at Holcombe beach, it is possible this point finished it’s life as a hafted knife.

Meet the Staff: Curatorial Intern Amanda

My name is Amanda Futcher and I am a third-year student at Algonquin College taking the Applied Museum Studies program. I have been working as a library/archives assistant doing a lot of work with organizing and cataloging the map collection, assisting in the digitization of photographic slides, as well as doing different odds and ends with other collections and giving a hand to deliver the virtual reality experience offered at the museum.

I believe that being able to go into a museum and see artifacts on display that are a direct link to communities who lived and used these items in the past from just a couple decades ago to a time immemorial, creates an incredible experience that connects us to different chapters of the history .

Through my program the students are tasked with finding and organizing a four month long internship for our final term. I have always had a passion for history and an interest in archaeology and human culture, and through my internship I was able to work at the MOA doing things I was interested in and expanding my skill-set and knowledge. The MOA has some amazing people working and volunteering here, and it has been a pleasure to meet and learn from them. There are so many unique visitors and stories that come through the museum, and it’s exciting to get to experience them!

One piece of advice I would like to give is to always try new things. You will never know if you like something if you don’t try, and even if you end up not liking whatever it is, you will still get valuable life experience. One of the best parts of this job is that there is always something to do, making each day a unknown adventure.

A Look Back to the Lawson Site Pot

Reconstructed pottery front face.
Front face of the reconstructed Lawson Site pot.

During the 1982 excavations on the Lawson Site, museum archaeologists discovered on of the more interesting deposits of pottery fragments yet encountered on the site. The pot sherds were interesting not only because we have been able to reconstruct them into a very large pot but especially because of the location of the fragments and what they were found with.

The pottery fragments were in the bottom of a large pit found inside the largest house yet uncovered on the site. This pit was located under the south bench row near the east end of the house. In shape, the pit was a flat-bottomed cylinder. During excavation, it was first though that this feature was a deep basin-shaped pit, but it was discovered to have a false bottom like a previous feature uncovered.

Recosntruction of the large Lawson vessel
The pot takes shape, showing temporary supports.

The overall pit contents include ceramics, chipped lithics, a hammerstone, modified bone, bone fragments, and carbonized plant remains. There was a small pottery concentration in the upper portion of the pit, but the most productive part of the feature was the lower portion. The bottom of the pit was lined with many pottery fragments. The sherds had been purposefully placed around the edges and bottom of the pit in the same way that one would use the tile fragments to line the bottom of a flower pot.

Resting above the main sherd concentration were the articulated radius and ulna of a black bear showing cutting and chewing marks on the bone. Below the main pottery concentration was a complete upper carapace of a turtle, unfortunately warped from resting upside down on a fist sized rock.

The pot fragments found lining the bottom of the pit were glued together to form almost two thirds of the large pottery vessel depicted in the above photo. The rim of the pot had multiple castellation’s but was completely undecorated (Niagara collared type), a common style of pottery on the Lawson Site.

Update: New digital technology allows us to reconstruct these pottery pieces virtually as opposed to physically which promotes the conservation and longevity of the original artifacts.

Originally featured in Palisade Post 1988 Vol.8 no.3

by Dave Smith

 

MOA Staff Post: Zsofia Agoston

This photo was taken by the forested creek behind MOA!

Hello Everyone! My name is Zsofia Agoston, and I am a third-year student at Western University majoring in Anthropology and Museum/Curatorial Studies. This year I have been working as a Curatorial Assistant doing an array of jobs including cataloguing archaeological donations, overlooking our archaeological inventory, and maintaining our gallery and exhibition spaces. Prior to this role, I volunteered at the MOA since September of 2016. Read more